LOOK BACK, PONDER, AND MOVE ON

GLIMPSES OF
THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
IN SAVANNAH
1750-1900


The Exhibit as it appeared at the Beach Institute in the summer of 1998

Introduction

“Look Back, Ponder, and Move On” is the beginning of an exploration of the African American journey in Savannah. Part I traces the journey essentially from 1750 to 1900. During those 150 fateful years African Americans had gone from being bondspeople to citizens of the American Republic working and building their destiny along with other citizens. Despite the trauma and tragedy of the journey there are heroes and heroines—black and white—whose stalwart examples of courage and integrity offer inspiration to us today. This exhibition is a small effort to begin to remove the cloak of oblivion from our past and, hopefully, to establish some meaningful dialogues that can illumine our present and our future. We cannot change the past be we can together build a better tomorrow in which we can all take pride.


 



 

Carroll Greene
Guest Curator

This exhibit was first installed at The Beach Institute in Savannah. This on-line version of the exhibit is intended to duplicate as much as possible the experience of seeing the exhibit in person. However, not all the images and artifacts in the exhibit can be seen here. Conversely, some new information has been included here.
To view the exhibit you can either move sequentially from one section to the next, or choose from the following menu what sections you wish to visit. Some pages include links to other pages which explore the topic in greater detail.
 
 

Antebellum Savannah

Olaudah Equiano, an Early Black Visitor to Savannah
Antebellum Black Congregations
The Gullah Culture
Muslims in Coastal Georgia
Slavery in Savannah
Free Blacks in Savannah
Anti-Slavery Efforts
Advertisements for Runaway Slaves
Laurel Grove Cemetery South
Antebellum Education

Civil War Era

Susie King Taylor, the Life of a Civil War Contemporary
The Civil War Era

Reconstruction

Families
The Reconstruction Era
Education During Reconstruction
Richard Wright and the Founding of GISC
Did You Know . . .
 

Conclusion


Another view of the exhibit

Curator of the Exhibit:  Carroll Greene

Acknowledgments


The original exhibit:
Presented by the City of Savannah
Department of Cultural Affairs/Leisure Services Bureau,
and supported in part by the Georgia Council for the Arts through appropriations
from the Georgia General Assembly.

The Beach Institute and King-Tisdell Cottage Foundation
can be reached at
912-234-8000
Correspondence should be directed to
The King-Tisdell Cottage Foundation,
502 East Harris St.,
Savannah GA 31401

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